Brita faucet filters

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Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Mon Apr 04, 2016 2:23 pm

Hey,

Does anybody have any experience with the Brita faucet filters?  I know they don't filter everything out, and you have to change the filters about every 3 months.  But they seem very reasonably priced, and should improve the taste/odor and filter out some bad stuff, if they work as advertised.

Thanks in advance for any feedback  :D
Last edited by jafs on Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brita faucet filers

Post by dualstow » Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:02 pm

I use the pitcher filters by Brita. Once upon a time, I tried a faucet filter, PuR brand I think, and they kept falling off.
Now we have these big faucet heads, almost like a showerhead, and are sticking with the pitcher filters.

This is a timely post because we have a chance to replace our lead water main at the same time as a neighbor and are thinking to have our water tested first.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Tue Apr 05, 2016 8:20 am

Wow - nobody has any experience with these?
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Maddy » Tue Apr 05, 2016 8:41 am

I've never used a Brita filter, but recently I've been doing a lot of research on water filters generally.  From my reading, I've gathered that the Brita filters are pretty much bottom-of-the-line and intended primarily to improve the taste of water rather than to remove any real nasties.  There are some very good filters out there, but the technologies vary greatly in terms of what they're able to remove.  The logical approach would be to get your water tested and determine exactly what you've got, then choose a filter optimally suited for that.  I'm on a well, so I couldn't care less about fluoride, chlorine, and volatile organic compounds, whereas agricultural byproducts (coliform bacteria, nitrate) and natural metals are always potential concerns.  Your situation may be quite different.  Do you know what you're trying to filter out?  Have you looked at the Big Berkey or Doulton filters?
Last edited by Maddy on Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Tue Apr 05, 2016 9:08 am

I agree, it's not high level as far as what it takes out.

We're mostly concerned about odor/taste - that's why I'm not looking at the more expensive stuff right now.  But according to the ads, the Brita does take out some nasty stuff.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by 2thefuture » Tue Apr 05, 2016 9:12 am

Jafs .... You may find the info Scott Hunt has @ https://www.youtube.com/user/engineer775/playlists to be helpful.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Libertarian666 » Tue Apr 05, 2016 10:13 am

I have used Brita filters and they do improve the taste.

At home I have a Big Berkey, which is supposed to take out a lot more crap.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:01 am

Thanks - did you use the ones that attach to the faucet?

If so, how well did it work?  Some reviews say that it doesn't attach very securely, which tends towards leaks, and that it greatly reduces the non-filtered water (although I'm not sure that makes much sense, given the design).
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Libertarian666 » Tue Apr 05, 2016 3:26 pm

jafs wrote: Thanks - did you use the ones that attach to the faucet?

If so, how well did it work?  Some reviews say that it doesn't attach very securely, which tends towards leaks, and that it greatly reduces the non-filtered water (although I'm not sure that makes much sense, given the design).
I think we tried the faucet type and didn't like it, although I can't remember the details because it was some time ago. I used the pitcher type successfully.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by dualstow » Tue Apr 05, 2016 5:27 pm

Libertarian666 wrote: At home I have a Big Berkey, which is supposed to take out a lot more crap.
Looks good. I might have to get that instead of new Brita filters.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by bedraggled » Wed Apr 06, 2016 5:05 am

I can recommend a company that we have used of 15 or more years.  The price range is $200- $400 for a counter top system with replacement filters needed every 9 months or so.  Replacement filters might begin at $80.  As we average 3 gallons of water per day, we replace 2 filters every 9 months.  I think our replacement filters cost is $140, including shipping.

This is a ceramic filter system, not reverse osmosis.

The company was started by a retired chiropractor on Long Island, NY, who was concerned about cancer agents in the water supply.  THe company has since relocated to Florida.

I once used their ultra-violet treatment system to supplement the filtration process but decided that was over-kill, at least for now.  I had to plug the ultra-violet unit in.  Some other time, maybe.

You might conclude this system is pricey but it seems to work.

Let me know.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Maddy » Wed Apr 06, 2016 6:21 am

When comparing different models, be sure and take account of the expected life of the filter elements.  Many models require the elements to be replaced fairly regularly, regardless of the amount of use, or else they become reservoirs of bacteria.  Also, note the difference between a "filter" and a "purifier" in terms of their ability to remove bacteria and viruses.

The Big Berkey is a "purifier," which when used with a black carbon block filter removes a wide range of bacteria and viruses.  That's a big deal to me because I draw from untreated groundwater.  However, even if you're on a city water system, I'd think it would be assuring to know that in a pinch you could run pond water or roof run-off through the thing and it would be perfectly drinkable.

The Berkey is extremely inexpensive to run when you consider the number of gallons you get per element and the fact that the elements can be cleaned and reused. 
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by bedraggled » Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:18 am

I guess mine is a purifier, considering the price.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by dualstow » Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:24 am

Maddy wrote: ...
  Also, note the difference between a "filter" and a "purifier" in terms of their ability to remove bacteria and viruses.

The Big Berkey is a "purifier," which when used with a black carbon block filter removes a wide range of bacteria and viruses.
...
The manual says:
If you suspect a water source contains viral and bacteriological
contamination, add 16-drops of plain bleach or iodine to
each 1-gallon of water and wait 30 minutes in order to
pre-treat the water before purifying in this system. The disinfectant
will be removed from the water during the purification
process, leaving no odor or taste.
So it looks like you have to treat the water, and then the Berkey will remove your treatment chemicals.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Libertarian666 » Wed Apr 06, 2016 10:29 am

Maddy wrote: When comparing different models, be sure and take account of the expected life of the filter elements.  Many models require the elements to be replaced fairly regularly, regardless of the amount of use, or else they become reservoirs of bacteria.  Also, note the difference between a "filter" and a "purifier" in terms of their ability to remove bacteria and viruses.

The Big Berkey is a "purifier," which when used with a black carbon block filter removes a wide range of bacteria and viruses.  That's a big deal to me because I draw from untreated groundwater.  However, even if you're on a city water system, I'd think it would be assuring to know that in a pinch you could run pond water or roof run-off through the thing and it would be perfectly drinkable.

The Berkey is extremely inexpensive to run when you consider the number of gallons you get per element and the fact that the elements can be cleaned and reused.
Warning: the black filter elements, assuming that's what you are talking about, have been highly unreliable in the past. We went through about 10 of them trying to find 4 that wouldn't fail within a few days of installation. If they have fixed the quality control problem(s), then they would be a good choice. In the meantime, we are using the white ceramic filter elements.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by dualstow » Wed Apr 06, 2016 11:17 am

Wow, sounds like a hassle. Maybe I'll stick with Brita pitchers after all.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Apr 06, 2016 11:58 am

dualstow wrote: Wow, sounds like a hassle. Maybe I'll stick with Brita pitchers after all.
Every year I also point you to this: http://www.purewaterproducts.com/economy-ro  ;)
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Wed Apr 06, 2016 12:06 pm

RO systems filter a lot of stuff, and don't have some of the concerns about other kinds of filtration, and those look like a good deal.

My concern/issue with RO systems is that you lose/waste a lot of water with them - something like 4 gallons for every gallon of water you use.

It's a real shame.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:06 pm

jafs wrote: My concern/issue with RO systems is that you lose/waste a lot of water with them - something like 4 gallons for every gallon of water you use.

It's a real shame.
Who cares?  It's not water you want to be drinking.  And its not like you ever notice.  I don't know if it qualifies as grey water, but you could capture and reuse it if you're going to persist in being that anal about it.  ;)

I've only had to replace the set of filters once in three years.  I have a TDS meter to check when its time.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Pointedstick » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:26 pm

I care because I live in the desert and water is expensive! But I suppose you don't install one of these things for the whole house, and instead hook it up to a little fresh faced on your kitchen sink, right? But in that case, you're still using/cooking with/bathing with unfiltered water.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:41 pm

Pointedstick wrote: I care because I live in the desert and water is expensive! But I suppose you don't install one of these things for the whole house, and instead hook it up to a little fresh faced on your kitchen sink, right? But in that case, you're still using/cooking with/bathing with unfiltered water.
Yep, but you can use it for cooking and drinking (seriously, get a pressure cooker if you need to use a gallon of water for cooking at a time!).  For the shower, I have this (without the free head): http://www.amazon.com/Sprite-HO2-WH-M-U ... 006LQPJIU/

I only use the municipal water "naked" for using the OralBreeze (I've temporarily detached the ShowerBreeze because it's not working with the filter + flexible hose head, puts too much weight on it), occasional hand-washing, watering the indoor plants and dish washing.  But the municipal water is relatively clean of bugs, just full of toxic chemicals, heavy metals and nasty stuff like that.  The filters were pretty disgustingly gooped when I changed them.  Must been all the rocket percholate!  ;)

Hmm, I guess I really should get some kind of filter to use on the outdoor hose and water supply to the plants.  A RO wouldn't be appropriate because plants need the minerals that a RO filters out: http://www.purewaterproducts.com/garden-hose-filters

The RO outlet hose just attaches to the outgoing drain pipe so it's easy enough to divert if its actually safe to use for something.  But its NOT the same thing as low pH acid water from a water alkalizer.  It's toxic water.
Last edited by MachineGhost on Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:56 pm

I care, because I care about not wasting precious resources.

So, if there are other filtration systems that work well enough for us that don't waste all that water, then I'd prefer to use those.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Maddy » Wed Apr 06, 2016 3:26 pm

Don't reverse osmosis systems demineralize the water?  My understanding is that over time demineralized water causes calcium, magnesium, and other necessary minerals to be leeched out of your system.  I seem to recall some mention of adding Himalayan salt to RO-filtered water to avoid that problem.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by Maddy » Wed Apr 06, 2016 3:34 pm

Libertarian666 wrote: Warning: the black filter elements, assuming that's what you are talking about, have been highly unreliable in the past. We went through about 10 of them trying to find 4 that wouldn't fail within a few days of installation. If they have fixed the quality control problem(s), then they would be a good choice. In the meantime, we are using the white ceramic filter elements.
That was quite a few years back.  I'm not aware of any problem since then, but I'd be interested in any information to the contrary.
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Re: Brita faucet filters

Post by jafs » Wed Apr 06, 2016 3:57 pm

Maddy wrote: Don't reverse osmosis systems demineralize the water?  My understanding is that over time demineralized water causes calcium, magnesium, and other necessary minerals to be leeched out of your system.  I seem to recall some mention of adding Himalayan salt to RO-filtered water to avoid that problem.
I believe that's right, from the little research I did.
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