It's all about China

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dualstow
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Re: It's all about China

Post by dualstow » Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:02 am

Kbg wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:27 pm
I may have read the article too quickly...if I did, apologies! :-[
Well, to be fair you’ve only had a year to read it. O0
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Re: It's all about China

Post by Kbg » Thu Nov 15, 2018 11:40 am

dualstow wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:02 am
Kbg wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:27 pm
I may have read the article too quickly...if I did, apologies! :-[
Well, to be fair you’ve only had a year to read it. O0
Nice! Pulling knife out of gut now. :-)
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Re: It's all about China

Post by dualstow » Fri Nov 16, 2018 7:17 am

😂
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Re: It's all about China

Post by Kriegsspiel » Tue May 14, 2019 8:02 am

Life as one of China’s industrial worker ants did not suit Liu Xu: waking up early in factory accommodation, working for 11 hours operating a machine in the tool-making factory, eating all his meals in the factory canteen and going to bed, only to wake up and do it again.

His parents spent most of their lives in deadening jobs — his father on construction sites and his mother in factories — but 23-year-old Liu Xu lasted just a year in a factory in the southern China city of Dongguan. Half of that was the time his company invested in training him to work the machine before he up and quit.

Like Liu, a generation of young Chinese is turning its back on the factory jobs that once fueled China’s growth — and they are helping to transform the economy by doing it.

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Re: It's all about China

Post by ochotona » Thu May 30, 2019 5:53 pm

Liz Ann Sonders @ Schwab pointed today out that steel and aluminum tarriffs haven't increased employment in those sub-sectors.
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Re: It's all about China

Post by dualstow » Thu May 30, 2019 8:46 pm

ochotona wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 5:53 pm
Liz Ann Sonders @ Schwab pointed out today that steel and aluminum tarriffs haven't increased employment in those sub-sectors.
Haven’t galvanized the workforce?
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Re: It's all about China

Post by ochotona » Thu May 30, 2019 8:48 pm

dualstow wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 8:46 pm
ochotona wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 5:53 pm
Liz Ann Sonders @ Schwab pointed out today that steel and aluminum tarriffs haven't increased employment in those sub-sectors.
Haven’t galvanized the workforce?
Naw, galvanization involves zinc.
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Re: It's all about China

Post by Kriegsspiel » Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:05 am

To die, to sleep
To sleep, perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
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Re: It's all about China

Post by shekels » Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:55 am

Kriegsspiel wrote:
Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:05 am
https://www.quora.com/How-is-China-able ... ustainable

Interesting read.
Smart thinking on there part.
But how many restrictions would surface if lakes were taken over to raise seafood
instead of jet ski's ? :D
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Re: It's all about China

Post by Xan » Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:56 am

Kriegsspiel wrote:
Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:05 am
https://www.quora.com/How-is-China-able ... ustainable

Interesting read.
Wow... They're going to take over, aren't they?
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Re: It's all about China

Post by MomTo2Boys » Sat Aug 24, 2019 11:06 am

Xan wrote:
Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:56 am
Kriegsspiel wrote:
Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:05 am
https://www.quora.com/How-is-China-able ... ustainable

Interesting read.
Wow... They're going to take over, aren't they?
I call BS on a ton of different parts of that article. I'm typing with my fingers on my phone or I would go off even more about the problems in that article, but let's just start with the article's continued reliance on showing yuan in dollars to show just how "cheap" the food is there. Sure, if you're an American throwing dollars around, you can buy huge spreads of food in a restaurant like what the article pictures, but the article ignores that translating yuan into dollars isn't rational if your argument is that those paying in yuan are able to buy huge feasts of cheap food including tons of whole fish (they aren't).

And don't get me started on the real reason why China values the growth of vegetables, which is because its society and its government both agree that subsidizing vegetables is it's primary food plan for its country. Meanwhile, in America we're stressing junk food, sugar, dairy, more junk food, more sugar, sodas, etc. The result of this is that poor Americans can best afford Little Debbie snack cakes and cannot afford fresh vegetables, whereas in China it is reversed: poor Chinese families can load up on vegetables (but not fruit and CERTAINLY not meat/fish) and cannot begin to afford something like Little Debbie snack cakes, which don't even exist in China.

If we in America decided to prioritize the growth of fresh vegetables in our country so that even the poorest of the poor could afford them in abundance, and decided that sugar, processed foods, dairy, and sodas were products not even worth manufacturing in the first place, well, I'd bet we'd blow the fresh vegetable manufacturing lid off of China in no time. But we don't.
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Re: It's all about China

Post by Kriegsspiel » Sat Aug 24, 2019 3:35 pm

MomTo2Boys wrote:
Sat Aug 24, 2019 11:06 am

I call BS on a ton of different parts of that article. I'm typing with my fingers on my phone or I would go off even more about the problems in that article, but let's just start with the article's continued reliance on showing yuan in dollars to show just how "cheap" the food is there. Sure, if you're an American throwing dollars around, you can buy huge spreads of food in a restaurant like what the article pictures, but the article ignores that translating yuan into dollars isn't rational if your argument is that those paying in yuan are able to buy huge feasts of cheap food including tons of whole fish (they aren't).
Good point. I found a source for median 2015 real incomes for different Chinese regions. In Xinjang, where the author says watermelons cost 10 RMB, median income looks like 15,000 RMB. In the US midwest, 2017 regional income was $61,136. I don't know where the author got that $1.50/watermelon figure, but around here they're $4.00.

So in Xinjang, a watermelon costs 0.8% of monthly income, in the midwest US, it costs 0.07%, 11x more relatively expensive in China.

The fancy dinner for 8 that the author says costs $50 (at current exchange rates, 357 RMB) in Shandong, or $300 (2,142 RMB) in California would be:

In Shandong - 1% (for a Californian on vacation in Shandong), and 19% (for a Shandonger)
In California - 5.3% (for a Californian), and 117% (for a Shandonger on vacation in California)

of their monthly household income.

Note that the Chinese incomes have had taxes taken out, but the US ones didn't, so the numbers are off some.
To die, to sleep
To sleep, perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
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