The Health Care Cartels

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flyingpylon
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The Health Care Cartels

Post by flyingpylon » Fri Sep 07, 2018 10:30 am

At one point the "Trump as Tragicomedy" thread wandered off into a discussion of health care. Rather than disrupt that thread again, I started this one.

Here's an example of cartel-like behavior by hospitals in Cedar Rapids, Iowa:

Iowa Eye Surgeon Wants to Open His Own Clinic. For 14 Years, His Competitors Have Stopped Him
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Maddy
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by Maddy » Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:02 am

Thanks for posting. This, and other types of anti-free-market behavior (aided and abetted by bought-and-paid-for legislators and regulators), appears to me to be THE reason for the skyrocketing health care costs that, we are told, make even more government intervention necessary. When I hear people clamoring for "single payor" or "Medicare for all," I completely tune it out. There can be no meaningful health care reform when nobody is willing to discuss the underlying issue of cost and the monopolistic practices that drive it.

Remember the definition of economic fascism: a system of corporate monopolies protected by government.
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by moda0306 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:56 am

Maddy wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:02 am
Thanks for posting. This, and other types of anti-free-market behavior (aided and abetted by bought-and-paid-for legislators and regulators), appears to me to be THE reason for the skyrocketing health care costs that, we are told, make even more government intervention necessary. When I hear people clamoring for "single payor" or "Medicare for all," I completely tune it out. There can be no meaningful health care reform when nobody is willing to discuss the underlying issue of cost and the monopolistic practices that drive it.

Remember the definition of economic fascism: a system of corporate monopolies protected by government.
Isn't one of the driving arguments for "Single Payer" to have one large negotiator to keep down healthcare prices rather than a system of subsidized insurance that just pays whatever bill it is given?

If dozens of countries have adopted low-cost single-payer systems, why would we believe that our system would HAVE to be a giant giveaway. It seems like keeping costs down is the main BENEFIT of a single-payer system.

My "fears" of a single-payer system would be less around cost (overall cost, including my private insurance premium) and more around quality and lowered innovation medium/long-term, as well as just a sneaking resentment towards the idea that healthy people (I sort of fit in this group) subsidizing very unhealthy people.

To me, our current system is sort of the "worst of both worlds" (though I think that term is overused), where we pretty much cover everyone, but allow multiple layers of profiteering with little counter-negotiation. Even before Obamacare, via our employment system we were covering some of the most obese, unhealthy people through their employer plan.
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Maddy
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by Maddy » Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:55 am

moda0306 wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:56 am
Isn't one of the driving arguments for "Single Payer" to have one large negotiator to keep down healthcare prices rather than a system of subsidized insurance that just pays whatever bill it is given?
When that "one large negotiator" is a government entity controlled by the same useless regulators who have created layer upon layer of costly bureaucracy and who have allowed the corporate monopoly to thrive, we're simply talking about a different form of the same thing. The only proven cost-attacking model of which I'm aware is the one adopted by the Surgical Center of Oklahoma. Complete price transparency and no cost shifting.
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moda0306
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by moda0306 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 11:18 am

Maddy wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:55 am
moda0306 wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:56 am
Isn't one of the driving arguments for "Single Payer" to have one large negotiator to keep down healthcare prices rather than a system of subsidized insurance that just pays whatever bill it is given?
When that "one large negotiator" is a government entity controlled by the same useless regulators who have created layer upon layer of costly bureaucracy and who have allowed the corporate monopoly to thrive, we're simply talking about a different form of the same thing. The only proven cost-attacking model of which I'm aware is the one adopted by the Surgical Center of Oklahoma. Complete price transparency and no cost shifting.
So you would reject the premise that there are many other countries with "proven cost-attacking models" that are essentially single-payer? Or are you just talking about inside the U.S.?
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by sophie » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:11 pm

It's hard to quantify how many health care dollars can be attributed to government-imposed overhead costs, but we certainly know that the private insurance system is far worse. Going to a Medicare for all plan, with people paying premiums to Medicare rather than to private insurance companies and assuming no change in reimbursements, would instantly save almost enough to wipe out the federal deficit - I posted some details about this some time back. In practice, Medicare reimbursements are lower than what private insurance companies pay, so there would be even more savings - at some cost to institutions & physicians who would see a large income reduction. Which hopefully would be balanced out by the reduction in overhead costs.

I think what Maddy is talking about is taking routine medical costs out of the insurance equation, by allowing free competition and enabling complete price transparency. I think this is a very realistic point of view as well. There is no reason why most people can't be expected to pay for routine office visits, low-cost generic medications, and simple blood tests. These costs are comparable to what people currently pay for things like haircuts, going to the movies, cell phone service etc, once you take out the inflated costs that result from involving insurance companies. Medicare would then be limited to stuff you really need insurance for: catastrophic conditions, very expensive treatments, hospitalizations.

Oh if we only ran the world, eh guys??
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by Xan » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:27 pm

Sophie, I think that was something along the lines of the "MediumTex care" proposal: everything over $50,000 would be covered by the government, and everything under that would be an almost completely unregulated free market. There's a lot to be said for that.
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by moda0306 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:53 pm

Xan wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:27 pm
Sophie, I think that was something along the lines of the "MediumTex care" proposal: everything over $50,000 would be covered by the government, and everything under that would be an almost completely unregulated free market. There's a lot to be said for that.
Is that per year or per procedure?
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by Maddy » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:55 pm

sophie wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:11 pm
. . . Medicare reimbursements are lower than what private insurance companies pay, so there would be even more savings - at some cost to institutions & physicians who would see a large income reduction. Which hopefully would be balanced out by the reduction in overhead costs. . .
In fact, Medicare reimbursements are so low that many physicians are opting out of Medicare or limiting the number of Medicare patients they will see.
What appears to allow practices to take Medicare patients at all is the fact that they can shift their losses to private-pay patients by demanding higher reimbursement rates from them. Now if the Medicare rate became standard for everyone (and assuming no other change in the system), to whom will these costs be shifted?

I think MediumTex's plan makes a great deal of sense. Let insurance be insurance--indemnity for rare, catastrophic events. The change would hardly be noticed by the large majority of people with insurance, since as it stands the deductibles are so high they're paying for routine stuff out-of-pocket regardless. That's why I say the debate ultimately boils down to what you do with the free-riders.
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by moda0306 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 2:51 pm

moda0306 wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:53 pm
Xan wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:27 pm
Sophie, I think that was something along the lines of the "MediumTex care" proposal: everything over $50,000 would be covered by the government, and everything under that would be an almost completely unregulated free market. There's a lot to be said for that.
Is that per year or per procedure?
My bad I had the proposal upside down.
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by Kriegsspiel » Wed Sep 12, 2018 6:48 pm

moda, I recall a Megan Mcardle article on Bloomberg where she discusses how other countries with socialized medicine aren't controlling their costs and will eventually get run down, but that they started from a much lower point which is why they've been able to keep it going. Sadly it's behind a paywall now.
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sophie
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Re: The Health Care Cartels

Post by sophie » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:51 pm

Actually, I don't like the $50K deductible plan, because the huge expensive structure that drives up the cost of routine office visits, tests, and meds would all remain in place. I would like to see those things removed from the arena of insurance entirely, and made all self-pay. Third party billing, EHR/PQRI/all the other crazy documentation requirements etc would all disappear. For people truly too poor to self-pay, there can be Medicaid clinics staffed by residents at teaching hospitals, or volunteer-staffed free clinics - just exactly as they exist now. Insurance coverage should only be for hospitalizations and expensive outpatient treatments, such as cancer chemotherapy and dialysis.

Not to mention, if people are self-paying, a lot of non-compliant behavior and excessive testing, whether instigated by patients or physicians, would be instantly resolved. That stuff just wastes resources not to mention everybody's time.
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