Page 2 of 2

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Sun Oct 30, 2022 4:22 pm
by coasting
Mark Leavy wrote:
Sun Oct 30, 2022 10:59 am
You can buy just 1 share (at whatever the stock price is) for most any (every?) stock on the market.

Some brokerages allow you to buy fractional shares (Interactive Brokers) where you can spend as little as $25 on each company. Not sure how voting would work though if you own less than a full share.
As the spirit of this thread was around shareholder voting rights (initially for funds, but now we also consider individual stocks), the question regarding fractional shares piqued my interest. Per this SEC page:
https://www.sec.gov/oiea/investor-alert ... hole-share
Voting Rights: You may not have voting rights if you own fractional shares. Your ability to exercise proxy voting will depend on how your brokerage firm’s fractional share investing program works. Some brokerage firms allow it, with special procedures, and some firms do not allow it at all. Ask your brokerage firm whether you will have any voting rights associated with fractional share purchases.
So it seems to depend on your broker.

Interestingly it appears that while ownership in a Berkshire Hathaway class B share does convey voting rights, unlike paid dividends the voting weight is not in same proportion to the class A shares. However, invitation to the annual shareholder meeting is extended to class B owners. So pony up the full ~450K for each class A share if you want to get full value from a voting perspective. If your PP's 25% stock allocation is in BRK-A, it makes precise rebalancing a bit difficult for portfolios under $10 million.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Mon Oct 31, 2022 12:40 pm
by Jack Jones
Last segment is Myron Scholes (of Black-Scholes Model):
Our final speaker today will be Myron Scholes who will discuss the best ways to adjust your portfolio if you are concerned about ESG. Some market participants who are concerned about carbon emissions are selling shares in their polluters, but Myron thinks that investment managers should first optimize the portfolio and then buy carbon credits to maximize returns while minimizing carbon in the environment.
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/b ... 1537283585

However, I found that to be the least interesting part of an otherwise excellent podcast!

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Mon Oct 31, 2022 11:14 pm
by vnatale
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... ow-organic

ESG Fund Labels Disappear in Japan as Clampdown Spooks Industry
No new fund has used the ESG label in last five months
Weak performance has also led to fund outflows in Japan
BySatoshi Shizume and Sheryl Tian Tong Lee
October 31, 2022 at 7:00 PM EDT

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Tue Nov 01, 2022 4:00 pm
by jalanlong
Maddy wrote:
Sun Oct 30, 2022 7:19 am
Kriegsspiel wrote:
Wed Oct 26, 2022 5:47 pm
The most thorough solution is to invest in individual corporate stocks. . .
What dollar amount, generally speaking, is required to get into an individual stock? I've always assumed that a certain minimum is required for no better reason than to keep transfer agents from wasting their time on the "little people."
My account is at M1 Finance and I believe you can buy as little as $1 of any stock on their platform.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Fri Nov 04, 2022 10:12 am
by Tyler
It looks like things are actually moving in the right direction on the voting rights front. Vanguard just announced a pilot program that allows retail investors to have proper voting power with their shares.

https://www.etfstream.com/news/vanguard ... narrative/

And less than a day later, Blackrock announced that they're expanding a similar program. Competition FTW!

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Fri Nov 04, 2022 10:35 am
by Kbg
I think they saw the writing on the wall legally and are probably deciding they don’t need the hassle of the potential law suits.

You don’t get to be a shareholder and defacto board member without taking on liability for your decisions/actions.

Regardless, it is a good trend.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Fri Nov 04, 2022 4:03 pm
by Maddy
My apologies. . . I thought you were talking about buying stocks directly from the company, rather than through a brokerage.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Sat Nov 05, 2022 6:36 am
by Kriegsspiel
I don't know how they were able to pick out me, selling my Vanguard/Blackrock funds because of their proxy voting habits, among all the market turmoil but YOU'RE WELCOME EVERYONE.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Sat Nov 05, 2022 8:57 am
by Tyler
Kriegsspiel wrote:
Sat Nov 05, 2022 6:36 am
I don't know how they were able to pick out me, selling my Vanguard/Blackrock funds because of their proxy voting habits, among all the market turmoil but YOU'RE WELCOME EVERYONE.
The hero we need. 8)

I'm also thankful for this thread for pushing me over the edge to trade out of a few Blackrock funds. Not so much for the politics, but just to save a bunch of money in reduced expenses.

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Sat Nov 05, 2022 9:09 am
by dualstow
O0 O0 O0

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Wed Nov 16, 2022 11:25 am
by dopplerdave
Well this is interesting. An offshoot of Consumers Reports is taking on the ESG people.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2022 ... -activism/

I wonder what changed at CR?

Re: Non-ESG ETFs

Posted: Wed Nov 16, 2022 12:27 pm
by vnatale
dopplerdave wrote:
Wed Nov 16, 2022 11:25 am

Well this is interesting. An offshoot of Consumers Reports is taking on the ESG people.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2022 ... -activism/

I wonder what changed at CR?


I do not believe that Consumer Reports is at all related to Consumers Research.

If I'm remembering Consumers Research correctly ... as opposed to Consumer Reports which has no ads and has no links to the products they review ... that is NOT the case with Consumers Research.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consumers'_Research

Consumers' Research is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established in 1929 by Stuart Chase and F. J. Schlink after the success of their book Your Money's Worth: a study in the waste of the Consumer's Dollar galvanized interest in testing products on behalf of consumers. It published a monthly magazine called Consumers' Research Bulletin. Leading staff from this organization, thwarted in their efforts to establish a collective bargaining unit of a labor union, protested and left to form Consumers Union in 1936. The magazine published by Consumers Union, initially Consumers Union Reports and now called Consumer Reports, gained popularity and market share over the Bulletin and largely supplanted its relevance.

Consumers' Research remained an educational organization whose mission is to increase the knowledge and understanding of issues, policies, products, and services of concern to consumers. It is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and works at the intersection of consumer issues and policy. It is described as a conservative group.[1][2]