Oxycontin

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dualstow
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by dualstow » Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:45 pm

Lawsuit time.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by pugchief » Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:23 pm

dualstow wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:45 pm
Lawsuit time.
Another money grab by politicians, IMHO. Not the mfg's fault if people abuse their legal products.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by dualstow » Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:48 pm

pugchief wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:23 pm
dualstow wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:45 pm
Lawsuit time.
Another money grab by politicians, IMHO. Not the mfg's fault if people abuse their legal products.
Legal, yes, but aggressively marketed without significant warnings about the risk of addiction.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by Kriegsspiel » Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:13 pm

Dozens of medical professionals in seven states were charged Wednesday with participating in the illegal prescribing of more than 32 million pain pills, including doctors who prosecutors said traded sex for prescriptions and a dentist who unnecessarily pulled teeth from patients to justify giving them opioids.

The 60 people indicted include 31 doctors, seven pharmacists, eight nurse practitioners and seven other licensed medical professionals. The charges stem from the government’s largest prescription-opioid takedown. It involves more than 350,000 illegal prescriptions written in Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia, according to indictments unsealed in federal court in Cincinnati.

“That is the equivalent of one opioid dose for every man, woman and child” in the region, Brian Benczkowski, an assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department’s criminal division, said in an interview. “If these medical professionals behave like drug dealers, you can rest assured that the Justice Department is going to treat them like drug dealers.”

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Re: Oxycontin

Post by Maddy » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:16 pm

Who are these "medical professionals?" How, in this day and age of computerized-everything, does this kind of prescribing pattern go unnoticed? Who in their right mind spends $200,000 for a medical degree and then risks everything? Who are these peoples' professional peers, and why aren't they speaking up? Cartels bringing in boatloads of heroin I get, but this kind of thing leaves me confused.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by boglerdude » Mon Apr 22, 2019 1:37 am

Maybe they're libertarian? Who are you tell an adult he cant get high
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by sophie » Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:19 am

Maddy wrote:
Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:16 pm
Who are these "medical professionals?" How, in this day and age of computerized-everything, does this kind of prescribing pattern go unnoticed? Who in their right mind spends $200,000 for a medical degree and then risks everything? Who are these peoples' professional peers, and why aren't they speaking up? Cartels bringing in boatloads of heroin I get, but this kind of thing leaves me confused.
Excellent question. You have to be several kinds of stupid not to know that Big Brother is watching you, via pharmacy records and your DEA number. Unfortunately, it's not hard for a person with below average smarts and above average greed to get through medical training. Just go to a foreign medical school that's easy to get into, like Grenada, and get a residency spot in a noncompetitive field where the slots don't fill up (e.g. primary care in an out of the way location). It's even easier for a nurse practitioner, about 5 years less training and they never have to do overnight calls.

However, it's interesting how they're talking about this as an "epidemic" with implication that there is no voluntary act involved on the part of patients. Has no one considered that Appalachia also has high/increasing depression & suicide rates, and that this is part and parcel of the same phenomenon? For example:
Prosecutors also documented how patients traveled to multiple states to see different doctors so they could collect and then fill numerous prescriptions.
This is common, and there is no mechanism out there to alert physicians to this behavior. This might have been one of the benefits of a national EHR system, if the Obama administration had done it right instead of royally screwing things up.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by jacksonM » Mon Apr 22, 2019 9:31 am

Maddy wrote:
Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:16 pm
Who are these "medical professionals?" How, in this day and age of computerized-everything, does this kind of prescribing pattern go unnoticed? Who in their right mind spends $200,000 for a medical degree and then risks everything? Who are these peoples' professional peers, and why aren't they speaking up? Cartels bringing in boatloads of heroin I get, but this kind of thing leaves me confused.
Back in my younger days there was an elderly doctor who was known for handing out prescriptions to anyone who asked and if you didn't have any money he didn't even ask you to pay. It wasn't oxycontin that people were mostly in search of back then but "downers" were all the rage. I think they called them "sobers". You had to take the prescription and shop it around a bit however, because many of the pharmacists wouldn't fill it.

I went to see him with a couple of friends who were also "patients" and we all sat in his office and sang together. I think he was as high as a kite himself. My impression was that he was just a lonely old man who enjoyed the company.

Unfortunately, he eventually got busted but I don't think he went to jail (at least I hope not). Just lost his license. Everybody complained about too many people spoiling a good thing by not keeping it a secret.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by dualstow » Mon Apr 22, 2019 9:57 am

Good times.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by pugchief » Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:38 pm

sophie wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:19 am
This might have been one of the benefits of a national EHR system, if the Obama administration had done it right instead of royally screwing things up.
LOL, aren't you in favor of some version of government run medicare for all? Why on earth would that not be yet another clusterf*ck? What are the chances a bunch of politicians, who know nothing about healthcare, don't make the problem worse, especially when you have people like AOC trying to control everything?
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by sophie » Tue Apr 23, 2019 7:13 am

pugchief wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 12:38 pm
sophie wrote:
Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:19 am
This might have been one of the benefits of a national EHR system, if the Obama administration had done it right instead of royally screwing things up.
LOL, aren't you in favor of some version of government run medicare for all? Why on earth would that not be yet another clusterf*ck? What are the chances a bunch of politicians, who know nothing about healthcare, don't make the problem worse, especially when you have people like AOC trying to control everything?
Point taken :-)

Except the private insurance companies are making a complete hash of things already. I fundamentally question the role of private insurance companies in catastrophic (not routine) health care, because there is a glaring conflict of interest involved. I think it's a safe bet that Medicare for all in that realm would be better. Medicare & Medicaid already cover the majority of high-cost/catastrophic health care anyway (about 2/3 of it). Not to say that stupid things don't happen, but it's probably not worth trying to optimize those away.

For routine health care though, I'm with you on that. Any form of insurance, whether public or private, makes zero sense, increases costs and headaches beyond belief, and prevents the kind of innovative strategies that we are seeing getting layered on to the existing system.
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Re: Oxycontin

Post by vnatale » Thu Nov 14, 2019 8:32 pm

technovelist wrote:
Wed Jan 30, 2019 4:55 pm
The war on drugs is over.
Drugs won.

Time to declare defeat and get out.
The way I am leaning....

Vinny
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