Where did you go to School?

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Desert
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Desert » Mon Mar 21, 2016 9:18 pm

TennPaGa wrote:
Desert wrote: For humor value: I was selected "Oustanding Male Student of the Year" at my community college
It was the tattoos, wasn't it?
I'm not gonna lie; I think the tatts were a major factor. 
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Tyler
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Tyler » Mon Mar 21, 2016 9:58 pm

Desert wrote: I think some percentage of engineers go into industry and are very motivated by their jobs, but I've run into SO many engineers over the past 25 years that are not all that satisfied with their career path. 
Well, engineering is a broad field and it's possible to get stuck in a specialized track you don't care for.  There's also a great deal of burnout due to increasingly rapid development cycles.  But in general it's an excellent choice that can take you many directions in life.  The core skill engineering teaches you is how to solve problems. 

I've never really thought about EE's going into medicine.  Cool!  When can I get my Wifi implant?
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Desert
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Desert » Mon Mar 21, 2016 10:06 pm

Tyler wrote:
Desert wrote: I think some percentage of engineers go into industry and are very motivated by their jobs, but I've run into SO many engineers over the past 25 years that are not all that satisfied with their career path. 
Well, engineering is a broad field and it's possible to get stuck in a specialized track you don't care for.  There's also a great deal of burnout due to increasingly rapid development cycles.  But in general it's an excellent choice that can take you many directions in life.  The core skill engineering teaches you is how to solve problems. 

I've never really thought about EE's going into medicine.  Cool!  When can I get my Wifi implant?
Tyler, I agree.  The spectrum of jobs an Engineer can end up with is so broad.  I should have also stated that I've met many, many very satisfied engineers over the years.  I think the experiences are all over the map, depending on the individual's psychology, company choice, etc.  But I completely agree that it's a great field, and that the education and experience is practical and transferable. 
Our greatest fear should not be of failure, but of succeeding at something that doesn't really matter. 
- D.L. Moody

Diversification means always having to say you're sorry.
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sophie
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by sophie » Tue Mar 22, 2016 8:02 am

Yes, I agree - regardless of where you end up it's a great foundation - certainly far better than a "business" major or a liberal arts degree.  I just decided that while I wasn't unhappy in the industry job, I didn't see myself on that path long term.

Wireless implants are actually being developed as we speak!  I'm involved in a couple of DARPA grant applications in this area in fact.  Pretty out there stuff.

Also for general info, here's the list of courses you need for med school:  biology of some kind, preferably cell biology (1/2 year), inorganic and organic chemistry (1 year each), physics (1 year), calculus, English, and a foreign language.  That's it, and half that you should have from high school advanced placement courses.  My university had a natural sciences area major that let mediocre premed students satisfy those minimum requirements and then pad their GPAs with easy, worthless courses in psychology and anthropology.  Those were also the ones who would race into class to grab front row seats, try to sabotage your lab work, and play other little one-upmanship games.  A big reason why I waffled about going into medicine was that I wanted nothing to do with idiots like that.  Fortunately, medical school admissions committees agree.

Desert - where did your second-grade son get his information about medicine??  How those little guys are sponges for information.  Anyway he shouldn't expect to be making "a lot of money" unless he goes into a surgery specialty, and then he'll be too busy to spend it.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Pointedstick » Tue Mar 22, 2016 8:28 am

I have a brother-in-law who's a radiologist. Judging by the size of his house and the private schools he sends his kids to, I'd say it sure looks like he's making a boatload of money. But I know that was his explicit goal and he went into his specialty because of a supposedly favorable income-to-sanity ratio.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Desert » Tue Mar 22, 2016 6:26 pm

sophie wrote: Yes, I agree - regardless of where you end up it's a great foundation - certainly far better than a "business" major or a liberal arts degree.  I just decided that while I wasn't unhappy in the industry job, I didn't see myself on that path long term.

Wireless implants are actually being developed as we speak!  I'm involved in a couple of DARPA grant applications in this area in fact.  Pretty out there stuff.

Also for general info, here's the list of courses you need for med school:  biology of some kind, preferably cell biology (1/2 year), inorganic and organic chemistry (1 year each), physics (1 year), calculus, English, and a foreign language.  That's it, and half that you should have from high school advanced placement courses.  My university had a natural sciences area major that let mediocre premed students satisfy those minimum requirements and then pad their GPAs with easy, worthless courses in psychology and anthropology.  Those were also the ones who would race into class to grab front row seats, try to sabotage your lab work, and play other little one-upmanship games.  A big reason why I waffled about going into medicine was that I wanted nothing to do with idiots like that.  Fortunately, medical school admissions committees agree.

Desert - where did your second-grade son get his information about medicine??  How those little guys are sponges for information.  Anyway he shouldn't expect to be making "a lot of money" unless he goes into a surgery specialty, and then he'll be too busy to spend it.
Sophie, I don't know where my son picked up that idea.  I think he and his little terror friends talk about this sort of thing at school sometimes.  He's pretty conscious of money, and often directly asks how much money I have.  I refuse to tell him, and he finds that very troubling.  He doesn't understand why I'm unwilling to just tell him how much money I have in total.

Regarding incomes in the med field, I guess it depends on our views of what "a lot of money" is.  What do you think a full-time mid-career GP in the Midwest would make per year?  I really don't know. I would guess somewhere North of $200K, but maybe I'm misinformed.  If so, while that isn't fabulously wealthy, it's a pretty comfy life in a low cost of living area. 

I love the description of the front-row-sitting, lab-sabotaging suck-ups, by the way.  Funny stuff (although I'm sure it wasn't at the time). 
Our greatest fear should not be of failure, but of succeeding at something that doesn't really matter. 
- D.L. Moody

Diversification means always having to say you're sorry.
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Desert
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Desert » Tue Mar 22, 2016 6:30 pm

Pointedstick wrote: I have a brother-in-law who's a radiologist. Judging by the size of his house and the private schools he sends his kids to, I'd say it sure looks like he's making a boatload of money. But I know that was his explicit goal and he went into his specialty because of a supposedly favorable income-to-sanity ratio.
I've long felt that if I had tried to be a doctor, I would have attempted to become a radiologist.  Surgery would be way too stressful.  But I have this image of a Radiologist, calmly looking at X-rays all day, remarking without emotion on the various issues she finds therein.  I'm sure my image is all wrong, but it's all I got.  :) 
Our greatest fear should not be of failure, but of succeeding at something that doesn't really matter. 
- D.L. Moody

Diversification means always having to say you're sorry.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by dualstow » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:56 pm

When I was a kid, there was a guy at our temple who was a radiologist. I only remember two things. He had a cool Ferrari, and he was so fat that he could barely fit into it.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by sophie » Tue Mar 22, 2016 9:23 pm

Dualstow's radiologist is quite an image  :P  Sitting in the dark all day reading scans can do weird things to people.

Radiologists used to start at $400K (yes I consider that a boatload of money!) but that's changed in the past couple of years because the radiology CPT codes got completely slammed by the ongoing CMS reviews.  Those salaries are coming down for sure, or will very soon.

GPs and general pediatricians in private practice are somewhere not too far above $100K, definitely less than $200K.  Not that much more than engineers and probably less than that on a per-hour basis.  Don't forget that includes weekend, holiday and overnight call which can get pretty brutal.  I think that's the main reason why there are general neurologists in my department, apparently content to earn half of what they could get in private practice for exactly the same work modulo the call schedule.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by dragoncar » Tue Mar 22, 2016 10:11 pm

None of the above (AFAIK, the specific combination might be unique to dox me), but staying semi-on-topic I'll note (it is known) that I'm an EE who went into law.

p.s. I found learning about both subjects very rewarding, but practicing not so much.  Which is why I pursue FIRE
Last edited by dragoncar on Tue Mar 22, 2016 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by drumminj » Wed Mar 23, 2016 1:02 am

Not very active here, but thought I'd chime in given the # of UIUC grads.

University of Illinois, BS Computer Science, 2000.
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Re: Where did you go to School?

Post by Gabe » Wed Mar 23, 2016 9:54 am

University of New Mexico, BS Applied Mathematics, 2014. Was pretty close to a second BS in Computer Science, but settled for the minor and went to work instead.
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