The Permanent Supplement Regime

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Kbg
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Kbg » Wed Jun 01, 2016 1:13 pm

Does anyone have a succinct and simple summary of what is good/not good for one's daily diet? I've given up all hope of trying to find this information via a search engine because...

A) search results yield someone who is pushing a diet type agenda

B) the science seems conflicting

C) i have very little personal interest in getting deeply educated on this topic...reading a medical study has about 0% interest for me

Bottom line: I'd just like to eat healthy
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Benko
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Re: healthy diet

Post by Benko » Wed Jun 01, 2016 1:42 pm

There are many schools of diet and some people have issues which means what works for some people, doesn't for others.

Eating lots of foods with added sugar is generally unhealthy though e.g. 5 grams of sugar in the ingredients e.g. Kind bars are fine.

Partially hydrogenated fats are very bad, as are rancid fats e.g. deep fried foods.

There is general agreement that the following are very healthy (if you tolerate them):
--green leafy veggies
--cruciferous veggies (broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts)
--berries
--garlic, onions, allium family
--nuts especially walnuts


legumes e.g. beans, lentils are healthy if you tolerate them.
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Beyond that it gets more complicated and there are differing theories.

If you have "gut issues", then some foods e.g. grains, legumes may not work for you.

One simple thing to eat which can be very healthy is a "green smoothie". Try:
--1 tbsp. ground flax seeds
--1 cup mixed berries (unsweetened) or 1 banana and 1/2 cup berries
--1-2 cups raw spinach

Mayo clinic's recipe
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifes ... p-20049958
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Reub » Wed Jun 01, 2016 3:37 pm

And get your fiber every day! It's important to prevent blood sugar spikes, to prevent cancer, and also to keep your cholesterol levels healthy. I take partially hydrogenated guar gum (a soluble fiber) before most meals.
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MachineGhost
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Jun 01, 2016 5:10 pm

pugchief wrote:Interesting info in the slides. Any idea why he recommends avoiding mouthwash with alcohol?
Bacteria in the mouth convert nitrates to nitrites (necessary to produce nitric oxide). Typical overreaction to something small when there's bigger issues to be worrying about in the mouth. Just don't shower for a day or two and you'll probably get heaps more NO that way.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Jun 01, 2016 5:19 pm

Kbg wrote:Does anyone have a succinct and simple summary of what is good/not good for one's daily diet? I've given up all hope of trying to find Bottom line: I'd just like to eat healthy
Avoid fructose, fatty land meats/fluids (trim or lean), trans fats/Omega-6 oils and processed/fiberless carbs. Everything else is fair game.

An example meal plate would be approximately 1/4th full of lean meat, 1/4th full of a cabohydrate and 1/2 full of two servings of vegetables or one serving of vegetables and one serving of a low-fructose fruit like berries or one with a lot of fiber like apples. An optimal serving of lean meat to induce muscle anabolism in an elderly 70ish year old (worst case!) is 4.3 ounces (30 grams) cooked weight (any more will be oxidized as theres a hard limit to how much the gut can absorb), a serving of fruit or vegetables is 3.03 ounces (85 grams) and the carbohydrate should be 50 grams of net carbs (weight varies depending on what you measure, for instance its 7.1 oz of cooked parboiled white rice which has resistant starch (fiber), 10.60 oz of raw potatos before being peeled or 1 cup of raw oatmeal).
Last edited by MachineGhost on Wed Jun 08, 2016 4:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain." -- Thomas Hobbes

Disclaimer: I am not a broker, dealer, investment advisor, physician, theologian or prophet.  I should not be considered as legally permitted to render such advice!
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Wed Jun 08, 2016 4:57 pm

Followup. The optimal protein intake to maximize muscle anabolism is thusly:

Avg 22 years of age: .24 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per meal.
Avg 71 years of age: .40 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per meal.

So logically, the in-between point for an average age is 46.5 years, so you need .325 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per meal. Someone could probably come up with a linear extrapolation for all ages if they wanted to be really geeky. The gut has a limited capability of taking in protein at any one time; so if you eat above this level you're just oxidizing the protein and consuming what is increasingly expensive calories.

The important thing to take away from this is that you need to INCREASE your protein intake as you get older to offset sarcopenia.

Now, the other side of the coin is leucine, the muscle anabolism initator. People above 65 years of age have an inverse correlation with leucine, i.e. the less leucine they eat, the more muscle mass they will lose. And the magical amount for no muscle mass loss at all was 7.12 grams of leucine per day, which works out to be requiring 1.25 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per day or .4167 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per meal.

So this is why I recommend the rule of thumb of assuming each ounce of cooked protein has 7 grams of protein and to always eat 4 oz per meal. Some meats like chicken have slightly more grams protein per ounce, whereas others like lean meat have slightly less protein grams per ounce. Not sure about soy and other "low quality" proteins that are typically leucine deficit. The most leucine-dense protein currently known is whey protein isolate.

You could certainly use a leucine or BCAA supplement in place of eating so much expensive protein to make sure you get the absolute bare minimum of at least 2.5 grams of leucine per meal, but you'd need to make up for the loss of calories elsewhere. Now that I got BCAA in capsules, I plan on experimenting with my regular protein intake to see what happens.
"All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain." -- Thomas Hobbes

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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Fri Jun 10, 2016 1:45 am

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"All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain." -- Thomas Hobbes

Disclaimer: I am not a broker, dealer, investment advisor, physician, theologian or prophet.  I should not be considered as legally permitted to render such advice!
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Sun Jun 26, 2016 12:47 am

Very surprising! K seems severely underrated by everyone. A "high" intake would be at least the average intake of K1 (626.4 mcg/day) and K2 (57.5 mcg/day), i.e. a proper K complex supplement will be double those values (as they are).

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Dietary intake of vitamin K is inversely associated with mortality risk.

Vitamin K has been related to cardiovascular disease and cancer risk. However, data on total mortality are scarce. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the dietary intake of different types of vitamin K and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular disease risk. A prospective cohort analysis was conducted in 7216 participants from the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) study (median follow-up of 4.8 y). Energy and nutrient intakes were evaluated using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire. Dietary vitamin K intake was calculated annually using the USDA food composition database and other published sources. Deaths were ascertained by an end-point adjudication committee unaware of the dietary habits of participants after they had reviewed medical records and linked up to the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were fitted to assess the RR of mortality. Energy-adjusted baseline dietary phylloquinone intake was inversely associated with a significantly reduced risk of cancer and all-cause mortality after controlling for potential confounders (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.96; and HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.90, respectively). In longitudinal assessments, individuals who increased their intake of phylloquinone or menaquinone during follow-up had a lower risk of cancer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.95; and HR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.64, respectively) and all-cause mortality (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.73; and HR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.73, respectively) than individuals who decreased or did not change their intake. Also, individuals who increased their intake of dietary phylloquinone had a lower risk of cardiovascular mortality risk (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.86). However, no association between changes in menaquinone intake and cardiovascular mortality was observed (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.29). An increase in dietary intake of vitamin K is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular, cancer, or all-cause mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular disease risk. This trial was registered at http://www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24647393
"All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain." -- Thomas Hobbes

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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Maddy » Sat Jul 09, 2016 6:15 pm

MK et al., would you comment on the idea of using kelp as a one-stop source of dietary minerals?
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by MachineGhost » Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:07 pm

Maddy wrote:MK et al., would you comment on the idea of using kelp as a one-stop source of dietary minerals?
Vegetables don't have much vitamins or minerals per se, i.e. not RDA levels. So I wouldn't count on it. They're only useful for phytonutrients and fiber.

They also have a nasty habit of accumulating toxic minerals like thallium. There was a story a few years ago about that and kelp. Apparantly there's a county in Northern California where people are health nuts and eat way too much kelp in smoothies every day so were devloping symptoms of thallium poisioning.

Personally, I've found my self-grown organic raw kelp to overstimulate me and give me a fatique crash the next day. Don't know if thats a sign of toxicity or there's just something stimulating in it (I'm very sensitive to stimulants though I would get a rebound headache to indeed indicate it was that afterwards). Cooked kelp seemed better but it still kept me up way past my bedtime. It wasn't a wired feeling just lack of being tired.

EDIT: Ooops, my bad! I was thinking of kale not kelp. Sea vegetables are the most concentrated source of minerals so they would work for trace minerals. However, I don't recall seeing any were ever dense enough to meet the RDA, so look into it. Kelp is essentially used for getting a naturally concentrated source of iodine.
"All generous minds have a horror of what are commonly called 'Facts'. They are the brute beasts of the intellectual domain." -- Thomas Hobbes

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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Maddy » Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:32 pm

MG et al., if you were limited to just a few supplements, which ones would you choose if your goal were to bring about a significant increase in energy level?
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Kriegsspiel » Tue Aug 02, 2016 7:59 pm

Ephedrine.

Take a Bronkaid tablet (20mg ephedrine) and a 200mg caffeine pill and you will be wired.

Not recommended if your heart is prone to exploding.
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