Coronavirus General Discussion

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Hal
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Hal » Fri Feb 12, 2021 3:37 am

Oh no, not again..... announced a few hours ago :P

https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/sites/de ... ctions.pdf

Guess we can look forward to this again -> https://www.rebelnews.com/sydney_man_violently_arrested

<edit> On a positive note, we went to the Ballarat Botanic Gardens before the midnight lockdown start. Great statues there. The one in the image is about 12 foot high including the pedestal. Highly recommend a visit!
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:12 am

From a newsletter...

Vinny


Around 200,000 U.S. COVID deaths could’ve been prevented if we weren’t so screwed up as a country
According to the British medical journal The Lancet, 40% of the nation’s coronavirus deaths could have been prevented if the United States’ average death rate matched other industrialized nations. That’s nearly 200,000 people who died because of our nation’s policy choices.

The report went strongly after the Trump administration for its horrendous response to the pandemic, which, in turn, gave guidance and cover to Trump-minded officials at the state and local level to similarly and intentionally bungle it. But it wasn’t all Trump. The report makes clear that our crappy handling of the virus was the result of years of other, broader crappy public policy decisions that long predated him.

It’s simply how America rolls.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/202 ... lth-policy
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Xan » Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:39 am

vnatale wrote:
Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:12 am
From a newsletter...

Vinny


Around 200,000 U.S. COVID deaths could’ve been prevented if we weren’t so screwed up as a country
According to the British medical journal The Lancet, 40% of the nation’s coronavirus deaths could have been prevented if the United States’ average death rate matched other industrialized nations. That’s nearly 200,000 people who died because of our nation’s policy choices.

The report went strongly after the Trump administration for its horrendous response to the pandemic, which, in turn, gave guidance and cover to Trump-minded officials at the state and local level to similarly and intentionally bungle it. But it wasn’t all Trump. The report makes clear that our crappy handling of the virus was the result of years of other, broader crappy public policy decisions that long predated him.

It’s simply how America rolls.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/202 ... lth-policy
Even assuming it's true that some other handling of this would have made a difference (does it specifically say what?), number of deaths is only one dimension of this thing. That isn't the only way to keep score.

Just as a for instance, if we had surrendered to Germany and Japan in WWII, many of our young men who were killed would not have been. Would that have been good for freedom, prosperity, future generations, the economy, or really anything? And yet if we just go by "number of deaths", we'd have to say it was.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by pugchief » Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:51 am

vnatale wrote:
Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:12 am
From a newsletter...

Vinny


Around 200,000 U.S. COVID deaths could’ve been prevented if we weren’t so screwed up as a country
According to the British medical journal The Lancet, 40% of the nation’s coronavirus deaths could have been prevented if the United States’ average death rate matched other industrialized nations. That’s nearly 200,000 people who died because of our nation’s policy choices.

The report went strongly after the Trump administration for its horrendous response to the pandemic, which, in turn, gave guidance and cover to Trump-minded officials at the state and local level to similarly and intentionally bungle it. But it wasn’t all Trump. The report makes clear that our crappy handling of the virus was the result of years of other, broader crappy public policy decisions that long predated him.

It’s simply how America rolls.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/202 ... lth-policy
They must be referring to Andrew Cuomo and Ron DeSantis. Oh, wait... ::)
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by I Shrugged » Fri Feb 12, 2021 12:20 pm

Hal wrote:
Fri Feb 12, 2021 3:37 am
Oh no, not again..... announced a few hours ago :P

https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/sites/de ... ctions.pdf

Guess we can look forward to this again -> https://www.rebelnews.com/sydney_man_violently_arrested

<edit> On a positive note, we went to the Ballarat Botanic Gardens before the midnight lockdown start. Great statues there. The one in the image is about 12 foot high including the pedestal. Highly recommend a visit!
What happened, they found 10 new cases?
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Fri Feb 12, 2021 9:36 pm

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2 ... p_national


Massachusetts offered vaccine to seniors’ caregivers. Some are offering cash to the elderly to get in on the deal.

Teo Armus

The suspicious posts began appearing on Craigslist on Thursday afternoon, a few hours after health officials in Massachusetts announced a key expansion of who could receive the coronavirus vaccine. “Companions” to those older than 75 were now eligible, the state said, but only if these caregivers helped accompany seniors to vaccination sites.

Suddenly, it seemed on the classifieds website, plenty of younger residents wanted to start spending time with septuagenarians. Especially if money was involved.

“Some people [are] posting online, trying to get a senior to bring them to a vaccination site, or in some cases asking to be paid to drive somebody to one,” Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker (R) said at a news conference Thursday, calling the ads “pretty disturbing.”

Catch up on the most important developments in the pandemic with our coronavirus newsletter. All stories in it are free to access.

The ensuing fracas over the “companion system” has since been criticized by some state lawmakers, who say it all but guaranteed to encourage dangerous scams and failed to ensure that Massachusetts’s most vulnerable populations receive the vaccine first.

“We shouldn’t be having people haggle for vaccine appointments on Craigslist, Facebook, and other social media sites,” state Rep. Tami Gouveia (D), a public-health social worker, wrote on Twitter. “This isn’t safe, equitable, or effective.”

As larger and increasingly diverse pockets of the U.S. population suddenly find themselves able to sign up for a vaccine shot, the episode may preview the difficulties associated with prioritizing broader, more nebulously defined groups.

When the shot arrived in many parts of the country, hospitals and nursing homes took on the responsibility of distributing it to their essential employees. Seniors who began to qualify in ensuing weeks could prove they were eligible simply by showing the age on their IDs.

But granting strict priority to essential workers such as day laborers or farmhands, whose job arrangements are often more informal, as well as groups defined by a personal practice such as smoking, may prove easier said than done. There is no clear answer on how � or whether � officialsals might corroborate that an individual is in those groups and meets the threshold for a vaccine.

In New Jersey, smokers can now get the coronavirus vaccine before teachers or public transit workers

In Massachusetts, the companion system was conceived as an attempt to solve an existing problem in the state’s vaccine rollout. Like in many other parts of the country, technologically challenged seniors had struggled to navigate a complex website of appointments and frustrating scenes at vaccination sites.

For younger generation, securing vaccine appointments for parents can be ‘full-time job’

On Wednesday, state officials said that caretakers could start signing up for companion appointments on the same day as the seniors they were transporting to a vaccination site. It was the state’s first exception made for residents who fall out of Phases 1 and 2 of the state’s immunization plan.

But by the time of his early afternoon news conference the next day, Baker and several Democratic lawmakers had taken note of potential schemes on Craigslist.

One person in Boston reportedly wrote that they “Will PAY $200 to assist 75+ year old with COVID vaccine process,” according to a screenshot by state Rep. Mike Connolly (D).

A Cambridge resident said they were “Paying $100 to book with eligible senior for vaccine.” And in Brookline, one ad made an offer for “Free Pickup and Dropoff for Covid Vaccine.” (All three ads appear to have been taken down as of early Friday, although similar offers remain online.)

Many Democratic state lawmakers seized on the posts to criticize Baker for this and other aspects of Massachusetts’s immunization campaign, saying it failed to address the obstacles that had been preventing senior citizens from easily getting shots.

“The companion system will put thousands of healthy adults ahead of those who have the most significant risk of getting and dying from COVID-19,” a group of a dozen Democratic lawmakers, including Gouveia, wrote in a letter to Baker.

The group said the strategy could prove “dangerous” for seniors, “opening up opportunities for individuals with mal-intent” to prey upon older residents who lack reliable transportation or are in need of additional sources of income.

They suggested that Massachusetts should instead adopt a wait-list policy, by which young, healthy adults can sign up for last-minute appointments in case of cancellations or extra doses remaining.

But while the policy is in place, Baker offered a warning to elderly residents at his news conference. He urged them not to share their personal information with strangers and to report any potential scammers to the police.

“You should only reach out to somebody you know or trust to bring as your companion,” he said.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by whatchamacallit » Fri Feb 12, 2021 9:47 pm

Nothing to back that this is actually occurring but I had a thought tonight.

The fact that there is limited supply of the vaccine is actually making people more likely to want it than if there was enough available for all that initially would have wanted it.

Kind of like the toilet paper crisis. The fact that there is limited supply was making people stock up even more.

Just an interesting thought and may have not been a bad idea. I haven't seen anything but also haven't looked on why they claim there is a supply shortage.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Fri Feb 12, 2021 10:08 pm

Governors Are Easing Restrictions at Exactly the Wrong Time

by The Editorial Board
NYT > Opinion / 2021-02-10 15:21


Relaxing rules on indoor dining and other activities undermines vaccination efforts and gives a leg up to coronavirus variants.

By The Editorial Board

The editorial board is a group of opinion journalists whose views are informed by expertise, research, debate and certain longstanding values. It is separate from the newsroom.

Feb. 10, 2021, 3:00 p.m. ET

When reports emerged that a new, potentially more contagious version of the coronavirus was circulating in Britain, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo implored major airlines to require anyone entering the state from another country to first submit a negative coronavirus test. Scientists still had much to learn about the variant, but Mr. Cuomo was following a principle that has become scripture among public health experts: To defeat the coronavirus, you must act quickly. You cannot wait for certainty to arrive.

Today, we know much more about not only B.1.1.7, the so-called U.K. variant, but also several other variants that have since emerged. For instance, we know that B.1.1.7 is more contagious than its known siblings and that it is already in New York and other states. Experts warn that if not addressed carefully, B.1.1.7 could become the dominant version of the virus in the United States in a matter of months.

In light of this knowledge, Mr. Cuomo’s plan to reopen New York City restaurants for indoor dining on Feb. 14, at 25 percent capacity � and to soon relax other strictuures, like those for weddings � is baffling.

Thiis is a precarious moment in the fight against the coronavirus in the United States. Case counts are declining. The death rate is slowing down. The country finally has a president who takes the crisis seriously. The vaccination rollout has been a bumbling mess, but the situation is improving, and it will get better still: The Federal Emergency Management Agency has been activated to help administer shots, the Food and Drug Administration could authorize a third vaccine for emergency use by the end of this month, and President Biden is partnering with clinics in underserved communities to correct for early vaccination inequities.

In the meantime, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are pleading with the American public to strengthen its resolve on measures to reduce viral spread, like physical distancing, mask wearing and avoidance of settings where the virus is likely to spread most easily � think a restaurant’s dining room or a large, indoor wedding. The C.D.C. is also asking state leaders not to let up on closures and restrictions just yet.

Too many leaders � not just Mr. Cuomo � are ignorioring that call. Massachusetts and New Jersey are allowing businesses, including restaurants, to expand capacity for indoor services, and Iowa just lifted its mask mandate. The impulse behind these moves is understandable. Restaurants and the people who earn their living through them are in dire straits because they have not received sufficient government assistance. State and local economies are hanging by a thread, and everyone is exhausted by restrictions and desperate to return to some semblance of normal life.

But the number of people who get sick or die from Covid-19 in the coming year will depend on the outcome of a desperate race that’s underway, between human vaccination and viral mutation. State leaders should consider the dynamics of that race before they change course. Mutation is a function of viral reproduction, which is a function of viral spread. That is, the more the virus is allowed to pass from one person to the next, the more it is able to mutate. And the more it mutates, the greater the chances that it will evolve into something that is even more transmissible, or even less susceptible to existing vaccines, or even deadlier than the virus already is.

By relaxing restrictions now, state and local leaders are undermining their own vaccination efforts. To get a sense of what this looks like to scientists and public health experts, imagine a military general leading the fight against a foreign enemy � and then sellling that enemy deadly weapons on the side.

It’s not just their own efforts they are undermining. They are also thwarting their citizens who have been making collective sacrifices all along. Average people have spent the better part of the past year waiting for leaders to take charge. America finally has those leaders in place at the national level, but the nation needs better and more consistent leadership on this issue at the state level.

The decisions those leaders make in the coming weeks will determine whether America will finally crush this pandemic, or whether the pandemic will be allowed to crush America all over again.

--
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by mathjak107 » Sat Feb 13, 2021 3:59 am

An interesting look by zdogg who is my first source for information

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oAqW2uyMDj0
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Hal » Sun Feb 14, 2021 6:57 am

I Shrugged wrote:
Fri Feb 12, 2021 12:20 pm
Hal wrote:
Fri Feb 12, 2021 3:37 am
Oh no, not again..... announced a few hours ago :P

https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/sites/de ... ctions.pdf

Guess we can look forward to this again -> https://www.rebelnews.com/sydney_man_violently_arrested

<edit> On a positive note, we went to the Ballarat Botanic Gardens before the midnight lockdown start. Great statues there. The one in the image is about 12 foot high including the pedestal. Highly recommend a visit!
What happened, they found 10 new cases?
Hilarious! Love it when Gerald Celente rants. Actually 3 cases according to him.

24 minute mark -> https://usawatchdog.com/currencies-will ... d-celente/
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by barrett » Sun Feb 14, 2021 1:41 pm

mathjak107 wrote:
Sat Feb 13, 2021 3:59 am
An interesting look by zdogg who is my first source for information

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oAqW2uyMDj0
Thanks for posting this. It should be noted that the video is from almost three months ago. I really wonder if the successes of small island nations like Iceland, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, etc., can translate to a country like the US that is massive both in terms of land area and population. We have roughly 1,000 as many people as Iceland so I'm not sure that contact tracing would actually even work here in the US. MJ, was there info in this video that was new to you? If so, I am curious what it was?
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by mathjak107 » Sun Feb 14, 2021 2:24 pm

Iceland is an example of how we need to react and coordinate but on a larger scale .

None of our medical storage centers can communicate with each other to study data as an example ....there are few partnerships between these biotech companies and govt here ...

Our communication with the public sucks .

It was really just a wake up call for the untied states
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Sun Feb 14, 2021 3:40 pm

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‘It’s as if there’s no Covid’: Nepal defies pandemic amid a broken economy

Cases appear low and sports venues are packed, but protests are on the rise as jobs are lost and personal debt soars

https://amp.theguardian.com/global-deve ... en-economy
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Hal » Mon Feb 15, 2021 2:40 am

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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Kriegsspiel » Mon Feb 15, 2021 1:00 pm

2021: The Sequel
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Ebolarona
[It is a] fact beyond question that soldiers' battles, where one side is entrenched and invisible and the other advancing in attack, are things of the past, except in a wooded country or where all preliminary movements are concealed. We had soldiers' battles here, but by fighting them the lesson has been taught which the world will learn.
- James Barnes. 15 years before WW I.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:13 pm

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions ... p_opinions


Opinion: Covid-19 could have a long-term impact on the brain. We need more research.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by Kriegsspiel » Wed Feb 17, 2021 6:28 pm

Panel of people talk about it.

Dr. Drew, Viva Frei, & mathjak's bro Zubin Damania as a panelist. Dr Drew even brought up the 'high school science project' origins of the lockdown policy that I posted here a while back.
[It is a] fact beyond question that soldiers' battles, where one side is entrenched and invisible and the other advancing in attack, are things of the past, except in a wooded country or where all preliminary movements are concealed. We had soldiers' battles here, but by fighting them the lesson has been taught which the world will learn.
- James Barnes. 15 years before WW I.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by pp4me » Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm

Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Wed Feb 17, 2021 10:09 pm

pp4me wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm

Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.


Watching tonight's Celtics / Hawks game it looked like the Celtic players and coach were...

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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by pugchief » Thu Feb 18, 2021 6:58 am

vnatale wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 10:09 pm
pp4me wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm
Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.
Watching tonight's Celtics / Hawks game it looked like the Celtic players and coach were...
Ah, yes. The Woke NBA. We should all follow their lead.

How do you even force yourself to watch that? It's not even sports anymore, it's just a propaganda show. Rating are down so low, they are quaking in their Nike hightops.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by dualstow » Thu Feb 18, 2021 7:10 am

pp4me wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm
Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.
My wife does. I had considered it only because it supposedly keeps your glasses from fogging up, but i’m used to walking around with bad vision as i’ve been doing it for a year.
Feels like the end of the everything rally.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by mathjak107 » Thu Feb 18, 2021 7:50 am

At one time my vision was so bad all I saw were outlines without glasses ..as I got older that got better but reading is a problem so I use bifocals ...I think my dad was right ...

With the masks fogging I would have been in real trouble years ago , I wouldn’t be able to see much
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Thu Feb 18, 2021 9:15 am

pugchief wrote:
Thu Feb 18, 2021 6:58 am

vnatale wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 10:09 pm

pp4me wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm

Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.


Watching tonight's Celtics / Hawks game it looked like the Celtic players and coach were...


Ah, yes. The Woke NBA. We should all follow their lead.

How do you even force yourself to watch that? It's not even sports anymore, it's just a propaganda show. Rating are down so low, they are quaking in their Nike hightops.


Because I love basketball? At a certain time of year...in one week I will have played two nights of basketball, watched three or four Celtic games, watched two Providence College basketball games, watched in person six high school basketball games.

I watch Celtic games, including the 1/2 hour to hour pregame shows and hour postgame show. It's basketball. Not propaganda. As I'm writing this I'm listening to the Celtics being discussed on sports talk radio.

It's a great sport and I love watching it being played by the best players in the universe.

Did you ever play? When was the last time you played?

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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by vnatale » Thu Feb 18, 2021 9:22 am

mathjak107 wrote:
Thu Feb 18, 2021 7:50 am

At one time my vision was so bad all I saw were outlines without glasses ..as I got older that got better but reading is a problem so I use bifocals ...I think my dad was right ...

With the masks fogging I would have been in real trouble years ago , I wouldn’t be able to see much


At my worst when I was younger I was 20 / 400 in one eye. Meaning what the normal person could see at 400 away I had to be 20 feet away to see the same thing. Always thought that in the old days of survival of the fittest I would not have lasted long as the sabre tooth tiger would have been on me because it'd be far too late before I finally could see it.

Same as you my eyes did improve as I got older so that that eye went to 20 / 200.

I started wearing contact lens in 1968. The latest versions improved my eyesight to no worst than 20 /25.

However, since I've been home as of last mid-March I've not worn them at all. Nor glasses.

I'm able to read and do all this computer work without any aid. And, my near sightedness and lack of ability to see far is not really an issue when I'm not getting off my property.

I do wear glasses in the infrequent times I get off my property and am driving. But I take them off as soon as I get to the supermarket as I cannot stand them being all steamed up from my breathing. I see well enough to make my way around the supermarket.
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Re: Coronavirus General Discussion

Post by sophie » Thu Feb 18, 2021 10:55 am

pp4me wrote:
Wed Feb 17, 2021 8:45 pm
Has anybody seen anyone wearing double masks?

I haven't seen a single instance and I've been out and about quite a lot.

Maybe we've reached peak Fauci Fatigue.
I've seen a lot of double masking, and no evidence of FF (Fauci-Fatigue - love that!!!). But then, I live in ground zero of mask zealotry.

Hey dualstow, does double masking actually prevent glasses from fogging up? I've been having to do all my shopping half blind and it's beyond irritating. Not sure I'd trade off not being able to breathe though....one mask is bad enough on that score. Unless I combine it with that plastic gizmo that pug recommended, for lifting the mask off your face. That's just too much facegear to contemplate though.
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