Freedom

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Kriegsspiel
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Re: Freedom

Post by Kriegsspiel » Mon May 14, 2018 7:28 pm

Desert wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 4:19 pm
sophie wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 7:59 am
I'm amazed at how many people I know are hitting the end of their rope, and quitting/retiring/want to retire. Frankly, me included. I've realized my workplace environment is simply not sustainable
I also have been hearing of more and more folks departing their careers, either for retirement or just to do something less stressful. My theory is that the average white-collar workplace environment has significantly worsened over the past few decades, for a variety of reasons.
Yup, I think there's something going on there too. I've hated both white collar jobs I've had. Blue collar FTMFW. I'm going back to work in another blue collar job (I've alternated between white and blue once I got out of the Army).
Hey, maybe a silly question, but if you had a daughter entering college right now, what career would you recommend? Obviously it would depend on skills and interests, etc., but is there any career path that looks more attractive than some others?
If she leans blue; electrician, HVAC, nurse, police, military. If she leans white; sales, some kind of magical STEM job, construction management, CAD drafting and GIS software.
boglerdude
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Re: Freedom

Post by boglerdude » Tue May 15, 2018 1:42 am

Everyone should do cancer/aging biotech so we dont all die horribly (the status quo)

Disclosure: I tried it, burned out and retired at 30. (How? I live in a garage)
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Mountaineer
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Re: Freedom

Post by Mountaineer » Tue May 15, 2018 6:10 am

boglerdude wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 1:42 am
Everyone should do cancer/aging biotech so we dont all die horribly (the status quo)

Disclosure: I tried it, burned out and retired at 30. (How? I live in a garage)
I doubt there will ever be a cure for cancer, infectious diseases, or any other of the huge varieties of illness that afflict mankind - the best man can do is merely a postponement of the inevitable - which is a good thing from my perspective. Cancer research, for example, is largely a game of whack-a-mole. I can understand why you burned out at 30 - perhaps underlying the burnout was a sense (recognized or subliminal) of futility in the objective of the effort. There is only one way to die a good death. All my opinion, of course. Back to my morning coffee now ......
Romans 6:23 (New English Translation)
For the payoff of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.
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sophie
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Re: Freedom

Post by sophie » Tue May 15, 2018 6:58 am

Desert wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 4:19 pm
sophie wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 7:59 am
Desert, no need to justify your decision and you have the perfect right to retire regardless of burnout status. Nevertheless - it sounds like it's a very good thing that you jumped ship now, rather than after starting to develop physical sequelae from the burnout you're describing.

I'm amazed at how many people I know are hitting the end of their rope, and quitting/retiring/want to retire. Frankly, me included. I've realized my workplace environment is simply not sustainable
I also have been hearing of more and more folks departing their careers, either for retirement or just to do something less stressful. My theory is that the average white-collar workplace environment has significantly worsened over the past few decades, for a variety of reasons.

Hey, maybe a silly question, but if you had a daughter entering college right now, what career would you recommend?
I have a niece in college who did a pre-med track and is asking the very same question. Going to medical school now is something I just can't recommend to anybody unless you're super smart & infinitely energetic & hell bent on becoming a neurosurgeon. A physician extender like nursing would be better, although you still have to have a high tolerance for regulatory b-s. Medical research is an awesome career, but it's a long, hard, and very uncertain road. Best option is probably to become a veterinarian. They're the happiest people I know in the medical field, which is probably why vet schools are now more competitive than med schools. Chiropractic is similar, but that comes with a weird faith-based philosophy that I can't subscribe to.

I guess the best advice would be: find an area that makes you happy and then think about fashioning a career where you have lots of flexibility/options including the ability to retire early. The worst thing is to lock yourself into a situation where you have no choice but to keep working full time until full retirement age.
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Re: Freedom

Post by stuper1 » Tue May 15, 2018 9:37 am

Sophie or anyone else,

Do you have any thoughts on whether physical therapy is a good career field? My son is seriously considering that field.
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Re: Freedom

Post by pugchief » Tue May 15, 2018 11:24 am

stuper1 wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 9:37 am
Sophie or anyone else,

Do you have any thoughts on whether physical therapy is a good career field? My son is seriously considering that field.
Yes. PT, OT, PA or any thing else medical is great. Except maybe MD. Not sure if that's worth the cost and effort anymore.
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Cortopassi
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Re: Freedom

Post by Cortopassi » Tue May 15, 2018 11:37 am

Look at all the memory care/old folks homes going up. In my area, Arl Hts, IL, it literally seems every open space is being built up with those. I can think of 4 off the top of my head within a 3 mile radius, just built or being built.

We have a friend whose son is starting at Marquette in the fall on a 6 year PT track. It is and will continue to be huge I would think as the population ages especially.
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Re: Freedom

Post by pugchief » Tue May 15, 2018 11:37 am

Mountaineer wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 6:10 am
I doubt there will ever be a cure for cancer, infectious diseases, or any other of the huge varieties of illness that afflict mankind
Cancer wasn't an issue 100 years ago, because very few people lived long enough for that to be a major cause of death. The elimination [or control] of more minor diseases have allowed cancer to become a public health dilemma. I assure you at some point, humankind will find a cure [or control] but then some other disease will be the new scourge.
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Re: Freedom

Post by Cortopassi » Tue May 15, 2018 11:44 am

pugchief wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 11:37 am
Mountaineer wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 6:10 am
I doubt there will ever be a cure for cancer, infectious diseases, or any other of the huge varieties of illness that afflict mankind
Cancer wasn't an issue 100 years ago, because very few people lived long enough for that to be a major cause of death. The elimination [or control] of more minor diseases have allowed cancer to become a public health dilemma. I assure you at some point, humankind will find a cure [or control] but then some other disease will be the new scourge.
I'm hopeful, probably not in our lifetime, for nanotechnology. Shoot me up with those little buggers that will go around and do whatever wonders will be available at the time. Or we'll just flat out find the key to aging.

Assuming we don't extinct ourselves, I am sure the next big problem will be overpopulation and boredom?? because people are living full lives well into their 100s, or theoretically as long as they want.
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Desert
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Re: Freedom

Post by Desert » Wed May 16, 2018 7:59 am

pugchief wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 11:24 am
stuper1 wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 9:37 am
Sophie or anyone else,

Do you have any thoughts on whether physical therapy is a good career field? My son is seriously considering that field.
Yes. PT, OT, PA or any thing else medical is great. Except maybe MD. Not sure if that's worth the cost and effort anymore.
While I'm not real close to this area, I agree with pug on this. I have several friends that are PA's and PT's, and they all seem pretty satisfied. And the educational path doesn't look terrible. I did see that PT now requires a "doctorate," but it doesn't look as onerous as a typical science Ph.D.
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Desert
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Re: Freedom

Post by Desert » Wed May 16, 2018 8:10 am

sophie wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 6:58 am
Desert wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 4:19 pm
Hey, maybe a silly question, but if you had a daughter entering college right now, what career would you recommend?
I have a niece in college who did a pre-med track and is asking the very same question. Going to medical school now is something I just can't recommend to anybody unless you're super smart & infinitely energetic & hell bent on becoming a neurosurgeon. A physician extender like nursing would be better, although you still have to have a high tolerance for regulatory b-s. Medical research is an awesome career, but it's a long, hard, and very uncertain road. Best option is probably to become a veterinarian. They're the happiest people I know in the medical field, which is probably why vet schools are now more competitive than med schools. Chiropractic is similar, but that comes with a weird faith-based philosophy that I can't subscribe to.

I guess the best advice would be: find an area that makes you happy and then think about fashioning a career where you have lots of flexibility/options including the ability to retire early. The worst thing is to lock yourself into a situation where you have no choice but to keep working full time until full retirement age.
I like that summary in your last paragraph. My (now 11 year old) son's comments when I told him I quit my job were pretty humorous. He said something like "wow, you can DO that? That's pretty crazy, I've never heard of anyone's Dad just quitting and staying home." I hope it ends up being a positive for him as well, to see that there are possibilities other than lifelong wage earning, given some preparation. I'd love to see him go to Vet school, but his strengths are not in rote memorization that is required in many science classes, nor in hand-eye fine coordination required for animal surgery. He does absolutely love animals though, so we'll see if that leads somewhere. Right now, I'm guessing he'll end up in some crazy tech area that I don't understand.

It's interesting you mention Chiropractic. I saw a Chiropractor over the past year, a few times. I had never gone to one before, but I was trying everything to avoid shoulder surgery to correct an impingement problem. The orth surgeon recommended going in and removing about a half inch of bone, followed by a year of PT. After hearing that recommendation, my first thought was "well, I guess I'll learn to live with impingement." So I went to this young chiropractor, and now 9 months or so later, the shoulder pain is all gone. I can't say it all happened in his office ... he did have a lot of recommendations regarding my posture, seated position at my desk, in my car, etc. He also did some tissue manipulation to lengthen some muscles and work some knots out. The end result has been very positive, somehow. I'm not saying I'm a Chiro-believer, but in this sample of one, something good happened. Maybe he was operating more as a skilled PT than a chiropractor, however.
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Re: Freedom

Post by technovelist » Wed May 16, 2018 9:48 am

Desert wrote:
Wed May 16, 2018 8:10 am
sophie wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 6:58 am
Desert wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 4:19 pm
Hey, maybe a silly question, but if you had a daughter entering college right now, what career would you recommend?
I have a niece in college who did a pre-med track and is asking the very same question. Going to medical school now is something I just can't recommend to anybody unless you're super smart & infinitely energetic & hell bent on becoming a neurosurgeon. A physician extender like nursing would be better, although you still have to have a high tolerance for regulatory b-s. Medical research is an awesome career, but it's a long, hard, and very uncertain road. Best option is probably to become a veterinarian. They're the happiest people I know in the medical field, which is probably why vet schools are now more competitive than med schools. Chiropractic is similar, but that comes with a weird faith-based philosophy that I can't subscribe to.

I guess the best advice would be: find an area that makes you happy and then think about fashioning a career where you have lots of flexibility/options including the ability to retire early. The worst thing is to lock yourself into a situation where you have no choice but to keep working full time until full retirement age.
I like that summary in your last paragraph. My (now 11 year old) son's comments when I told him I quit my job were pretty humorous. He said something like "wow, you can DO that? That's pretty crazy, I've never heard of anyone's Dad just quitting and staying home." I hope it ends up being a positive for him as well, to see that there are possibilities other than lifelong wage earning, given some preparation. I'd love to see him go to Vet school, but his strengths are not in rote memorization that is required in many science classes, nor in hand-eye fine coordination required for animal surgery. He does absolutely love animals though, so we'll see if that leads somewhere. Right now, I'm guessing he'll end up in some crazy tech area that I don't understand.

It's interesting you mention Chiropractic. I saw a Chiropractor over the past year, a few times. I had never gone to one before, but I was trying everything to avoid shoulder surgery to correct an impingement problem. The orth surgeon recommended going in and removing about a half inch of bone, followed by a year of PT. After hearing that recommendation, my first thought was "well, I guess I'll learn to live with impingement." So I went to this young chiropractor, and now 9 months or so later, the shoulder pain is all gone. I can't say it all happened in his office ... he did have a lot of recommendations regarding my posture, seated position at my desk, in my car, etc. He also did some tissue manipulation to lengthen some muscles and work some knots out. The end result has been very positive, somehow. I'm not saying I'm a Chiro-believer, but in this sample of one, something good happened. Maybe he was operating more as a skilled PT than a chiropractor, however.
My wife and I have the best chiropractor in the world. As soon as you walk in the door, he says "I see that shoulder (or whatever is bothering us) needs some attention." He knows the human body, at least as far as the muscles, nerves, and bones, better than any MD I have ever gone to. If he can't fix the problem completely and immediately, at least he knows how to mitigate it. He has a lot of professional sports players as patients, and he and his former partner used to have Ross Perot as their patient, if that tells you anything.
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